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A Chemical Orthodoxy

Schools, Science and Education

But what if I’m just not that inspiring?

For some reason my Facebook feed has been dominated by little videos from the DfE advertising teaching as a career. They’re all quite similar, featuring some young, fresh and sparkly eyed 20-something talking about how wonderful teaching is as a... Continue Reading →

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Great Explainers: Richard Feynman

Richard Feynman was one of the greatest and most influential physicists of all time. Awarded a Nobel Prize in physics for his work on quantum electrodynamics, his academic career included working on the Manhattan Project and with Nasa investigating the... Continue Reading →

Novice and Expert Teachers

I've been reading into the difference between novices and experts in different domains. Most of my reading has been about students but I found this fascinating paper via Harry Fletcher-Wood that I thought people might be interested in. Borko &... Continue Reading →

Cognitive Load in Chemistry Practicals

UPDATE 14/11/2017 I have written a new practical instruction sheet for the thermal decomposition of copper carbonate for my year 7s (hence imprecision in method). When I made it I was surprised at just how many steps it broke down... Continue Reading →

Rosenshine Observation Form

Rosenshine's Principles of Instruction have probably had a bigger effect on my teaching than any number of CPD sessions, lesson observations or blog posts. To me they represent masterful, systematic teaching geared and optimised to enable long-term learning. I wanted to share... Continue Reading →

Encoding and Retrieval

One of our student teachers had a bit of a difficult time in a Q&A sequence at the beginning of the lesson. As part of our subsequent discussion, we looked at the difference between encoding and retrieval and how the... Continue Reading →

Practising Declarative Knowledge

This is not a particularly exciting post, but I think it's an important one (and it'll probably be my last for a while). A lot of people online have been trying to build science resources featuring SLOP: Shed Loads of... Continue Reading →

Playing at Psychology

There are a lot of teachers, like myself, who have a growing interest in psychology and its application to the classroom environment. I can't speak for anyone else but my studies in this area have been completely "student-led" and are... Continue Reading →

Niches and Knowledge

In 1135 a young Jew was born in Cordoba, Spain. His parents named him Moses, the son of Maimon. He spent much of his early years in transit, moving with his family from place to place, like many of his... Continue Reading →

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