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A Chemical Orthodoxy

Schools, Science and Education

Author

Adam

Data’s veil of ignorance

A few years back I went for a pizza with an old friend. We shared a pretty large pizza but somehow ended up with just one slice left between the two of us which we both desperately wanted. Bearing in... Continue Reading →

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Are educational videos rubbish?

A little while back I was observed teaching my year 10s about the development of the periodic table and Mendeleev's contributions. As per usual, I explained a bit, the students did some work, we went over their work, then I... Continue Reading →

The six best blogs I’ve read this year

I love reading education blogs, and this year has been a great year for it. There has been a ton of incredibly interesting stuff published, and I know that my practice has changed for the better because of it. I've... Continue Reading →

The Slow Practical

In a previous post, I described a simplified model of Cognitive Load Theory. The advantage of the model I presented is that it allows teachers a ready framework from which to make decisions in and before class about how best... Continue Reading →

Curriculum in Science: A Symposium

I started teaching in the Gove years; a time of enormous curriculum upheaval with all three secondary key stages seeing major changes in a bid for increased rigour, higher standards and improved performance on international assessments. In recent months, Her... Continue Reading →

Retrieval,workload and pedagogical content knowledge

I'm really chuffed at the number of people who have got in touch to say they are using retrieval roulettes and that they are willing to share theirs. I use one in 90% of my lessons and in my opinion... Continue Reading →

Simplifying Cognitive Load Theory

Sweller's Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) may be the single most important thing for teachers to know, but it was not necessarily designed with teachers in mind. The product of lab-based randomised controlled trials, it is a theory from the specific... Continue Reading →

Rotten Rewards

In primary school, there was an award given every month for kindness. Sponsored in the name of a young man who lost his life tragically young, it was a Big Deal. Given out to one student in the school every... Continue Reading →

I’ll never set a project again.

Years ago, I used to set a “model atom” project. In line with a school priority about developing independence, and my own beliefs about engaging students in science outside the classroom, I set the project with gusto. I carefully prepared... Continue Reading →

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